Friday, June 27, 2008

Glitter and Doom

I'm so glad I decided to spend the money to see Tom Waits' Glitter and Doom Tour show last night. I'm lucky St. Louis was one of the few towns to be a stop on the tour. We're the "S" in "PEHDTSCHJMBA"--the acronym of all the cities Tom is stopping at on this rare tour.

I have been sort of a mediocre fan of Waits in the past. I think I like him, I've gone to the trouble to acquire the majority of his albums, but I can't name the songs I like best and I don't know much about his history as an artist since my interest is all pretty recent. So I didn't expect such a theatrical experience. I suppose I thought he'd sit at an upright piano and just growl his songs away one after another just as I imagined he'd spent the early years of his career.

Instead he stood front and center on a round podium for most of the show and gave his band tricky stage cues that they followed perfectly. He was like a circus ringleader, surrounded by crazy props. The wooden riser he was on would puff dust whenever he stomped on it creating a smoke machine effect that flowed around his band. The show was an Experience with a capital "E." I'm a full-fledged fan now.

And so I can focus on my listening in the future and explore my expanded fan-dom, here is the set list:

Lucinda
Hoist That Rag
Come On Up to the House
Jesus Gonna Be Here
November
Black Market Baby
Rain Dogs
Trampled Rose
Goin’ Out West
Murder in the Red Barn
Anywhere I Lay My Head
Cemetery Polka
Get Behind the Mule
Eyeball Kid
Christmas Card From A Hooker In Minneapolis [TW on piano]
Picture in a Frame [TW on piano]
Invitation to the Blues [TW on piano]
Innocent When You Dream [TW on piano]
Lie To Me
Chocolate Jesus
Make It Rain

and the encore:
Way Down in the Hole
God’s Away On Business
Time

1 comment:

Stephanie said...

Yes, thanks Beth for taking us to this awesome concert. Harking back to your earlier post on how visceral music is, I have to say that I felt a lot of emotions during this show. I didn't always understand the words literally, but I FELT the words. His music doesn't seem that complicated, but it is perfect at bringing emotions to the front. Including some I would frankly prefer feeling in private rather than surrounded by several thousand other people.

Also his woodwinds and guitar players were fantastic.